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Apollo 20- Scary as Shit Winter's New Alien Fascination Rate Topic: -----

#41 User is offline   CRIMHEAD 

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 01:28 PM

View Postmonarch0, on 11 November 2012 - 09:41 AM, said:

It did take place 5 years before you said it was possible.


A manned launch? On a Saturn V rocket or equivalent HLV? With operational communication with Vandenberg?

The article said it was a secret launch. Big fucking deal, they happened all the time.

Guys, have the fucking respect to take the time and actually READ WHAT PEOPLE WRITE before you criticize their opinions.
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#42 User is offline   tobaccoroad 

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 01:38 PM

I secretly launch my mini rocket several times a.....month.....big deal.

Shoes
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#43 User is offline   Martini 

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 02:40 PM

View Posttobaccoroad, on 11 November 2012 - 01:38 PM, said:

I secretly launch my mini rocket several times a.....month.....big deal.

Shoes

Good summation of this thread.
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#44 User is offline   bucsbriana 

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 03:45 PM

View Posttobaccoroad, on 11 November 2012 - 01:38 PM, said:

I secretly launch my mini rocket several times a.....month.....big deal.

Shoes



Did you name it that or your wife?
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#45 User is offline   Dale Berra's Nose 

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 07:33 PM

Nate Silver says the odds of Winter winning this thread have jumped to 95 percent.
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#46 User is offline   Martini 

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 08:34 PM

View PostDale Berra, on 11 November 2012 - 07:33 PM, said:

Nate Silver says the odds of Winter winning this thread have jumped to 95 percent.

Buckeyebucco thinks so too. Even guaranteed his family.
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#47 User is offline   tobaccoroad 

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 09:18 PM

View Postbucsbriana, on 11 November 2012 - 03:45 PM, said:

Did you name it that or your wife?


That would be me. My ego couldn't handle whatever nickname she has for it.

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#48 User is offline   Martini 

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 02:57 PM

Here's some groovy spacey shit for you people into this sort of thing…

http://workshop.chro...ents.com/stars/

May have to reload.
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#49 User is offline   clemente_in_right 

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 01:55 PM

Here's one for Winter. From the book Ninety Feet from Fame by Mike Robbins on page 211. Darrell Evans is (or at least was) a true believer.

Quote

According to an article in USA Today, Darrell Evans and his wife, LaDonna, claimed to have seen an object 30 feet wide and triangular in shape hovering silently over a neighbor's house on night in the summer of 1982. The object, which apparently featured festive multi-colored lights, departed before Darrell could retrieve his camera. When the Evanses told their story, some delicately suggested that perhaps the couple had been looking at an airplane - there was an airport only a short distance away. But Darrell and LaDonna were convinced they'd been visited by a UFO. "My wife was a stewardess," Darrell told the press. "So she knows what an airplane looks like." Oh

It turned out that the Evans' alien visitors were intergalactic batting coaches. He'd been slumping early that season, but "soon after [we saw the UFO], things turned around," Evans said. "It definitely helped my career."

"I believe there is something out there," he continued. "They've evolved beyond war; they've come through it and they want to come and show us how. I hope it happens." In the meantime, they'll just help baseball players get out of hitting slumps. It's a good to know E.T. has his priorities straight.


This book, by the way, is outstanding. It's full of minutia and all sorts of interesting stories about the not-quite-so-famous from baseball history. I'm not quite done with it yet, but I highly recommend it for anyone who enjoys that kind of thing. The book is broken down in to fairly brief segments within each chapter. So, it is a great book to read when you don't have a long time to sit down and read.
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What about doctors who make house calls? Repairmen who know how to fix things? And ballplayers who hustle? And boxers who get carried out of the ring, instead of quitting because of stomach cramps? And what about the death penalty for scum who take a human life and snuff it out like it's so much garbage? I've seen the past, gentlemen, and it works. - William Shatner as T.J. Hooker in episode 1.1 'The Protectors'

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#50 User is offline   PF82 

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 01:59 PM

How can you argue against someone named LaDonna?
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#51 User is offline   Midnight Moose 

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 04:12 PM

Do you ever dream you're a spacefarer, on interstellar voyages? I do, and I bet I'm not alone. Wanting to "reach for the stars" seems like it's hard-wired into us, for whatever reason.
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#52 User is offline   ECBucs 

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 05:08 PM

View PostMidnight Moose, on 26 November 2012 - 04:12 PM, said:

Do you ever dream you're a spacefarer, on interstellar voyages? I do, and I bet I'm not alone. Wanting to "reach for the stars" seems like it's hard-wired into us, for whatever reason.


I read tons of books by Andre Norton in junior high. Need to look at some again and see why I liked them. At the time, I thought the books contained interesting stories of other worlds. Usually better written than most Star Trek plots.


http://en.wikipedia....ki/Andre_Norton
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#53 User is offline   Midnight Moose 

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 05:25 PM

View PostECBucs, on 26 November 2012 - 05:08 PM, said:

I read tons of books by Andre Norton in junior high. Need to look at some again and see why I liked them. At the time, I thought the books contained interesting stories of other worlds. Usually better written than most Star Trek plots.


http://en.wikipedia....ki/Andre_Norton


Oh, hell, as a kid I read Isaac Asimov, Robert Heinlein, Ray Bradbury, Arthur C. Clarke, etc...I'd eat that stuff up. In Junior High, I always had a science fiction book checked out of the HS library. As soon as I'd finish one, I'd check out another.
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#54 User is offline   Dale Berra's Nose 

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 06:05 PM

During the height of the Cold War, U.S. officials debated whether to detonate nuclear bomb on the moon in order to send a message to the Soviet Union, the Asian News International reports.

The secret project dubbed, “A Study of Lunar Research Flights” and nicknamed “Project A119,” was seriously being considered until it was scrapped because military officials were worried it would hurt the people on Earth.


http://washington.cb...d-war-in-1950s/
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#55 User is offline   CRIMHEAD 

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 06:18 PM

Ok, I'll jump in here as I've recently got back into Science Fiction. Just finished the entire Book of the New Sun by Gene Wolfe. Holy hell was that a beast. Dude's vocabulary is impressive as I had to go to my Kindle dictionary often.

Next up for me is Snow Crash as I've never read it, even though I've read quite a few William Gibson novels. Like some of the classic stuff. Hated Foundation by Asimov. Liked a lot of Phillip K. Dick stuff.

After Snow Crash, any recommendations? I definitely like the Cyberpunk stuff, but a classic that's edgy I'm down with.
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#56 User is offline   Dale Berra's Nose 

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 06:41 PM

Well, with the discussion of books in this thread at the moment, now is the best time to recommend one of my favorite books. I wouldn't classify it as "science fiction" as much as "post-apocolyptic."
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#57 User is offline   Dale Berra's Nose 

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 06:41 PM

Well, with the discussion of books in this thread at the moment, now is the best time to recommend one of my favorite books. I wouldn't classify it as "science fiction" as much as "post-apocolyptic."

Here's the Amazon.com review:

Walter M. Miller's acclaimed SF classic A Canticle for Leibowitz opens with the accidental excavation of a holy artifact: a creased, brittle memo scrawled by the hand of the blessed Saint Leibowitz, that reads: "Pound pastrami, can kraut, six bagels--bring home for Emma." To the Brothers of Saint Leibowitz, this sacred shopping list penned by an obscure, 20th-century engineer is a symbol of hope from the distant past, from before the Simplification, the fiery atomic holocaust that plunged the earth into darkness and ignorance. As 1984 cautioned against Stalinism, so 1959's A Canticle for Leibowitz warns of the threat and implications of nuclear annihilation. Following a cloister of monks in their Utah abbey over some six or seven hundred years, the funny but bleak Canticle tackles the sociological and religious implications of the cyclical rise and fall of civilization, questioning whether humanity can hope for more than repeating its own history. Divided into three sections--Fiat Homo (Let There Be Man), Fiat Lux (Let There Be Light), and Fiat Voluntas Tua (Thy Will Be Done)--Canticle is steeped in Catholicism and Latin, exploring the fascinating, seemingly capricious process of how and why a person is canonized. --Paul Hughes --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

http://www.amazon.co...e+for+leibowitz
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#58 User is offline   Midnight Moose 

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 06:42 PM

View PostDale Berra, on 26 November 2012 - 06:05 PM, said:

The secret project dubbed, “A Study of Lunar Research Flights” and nicknamed “Project A119,” was seriously being considered until it was scrapped because military officials were worried it would hurt the people on Earth.


So, lighting off a nuke on the moon might hurt the people on earth...but firing off 23 separate nukes in an 8 year period on Bikini Atoll...that's ok? There's some 1950's genius thinking for you.
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#59 User is online   oblongatta 

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 07:04 PM

View PostCRIMHEAD, on 26 November 2012 - 06:18 PM, said:

Ok, I'll jump in here as I've recently got back into Science Fiction. Just finished the entire Book of the New Sun by Gene Wolfe. Holy hell was that a beast. Dude's vocabulary is impressive as I had to go to my Kindle dictionary often.

Next up for me is Snow Crash as I've never read it, even though I've read quite a few William Gibson novels. Like some of the classic stuff. Hated Foundation by Asimov. Liked a lot of Phillip K. Dick stuff.

After Snow Crash, any recommendations? I definitely like the Cyberpunk stuff, but a classic that's edgy I'm down with.


Lately I've been reading a whole bunch of classic science fiction in between newer series book sthat involve heavy time investments. I just went through a whole bunch of Philip K. Dick. I never realized how prolific he was, that's a shit load of books. I think he's probably one of the best sci-fi authors for ideas (which is why there's so many movies based on his short stories/novellas). I think the catch is that his writing style isn't always that great.

Anyway I had this idea since I found out that kindle has a bunch fo older books available for free and at the same time I saw the Prophets of Science Fiction series on the science channel. I just read 20,000 Leagues under the Sea by Verne and while it was interesting and very innovative at the time, it was tough to read. Not sure I'll get another Verne book soon.

As for Snow Crash, I loved that book. It'll feel a bit dated to you and was sort of adolescent but that might be from reading the rest of Stephenson's work which feels much more mature. If you like Snow Crash, you might want to read his most recent book Reamde which is probably the most similar to Snow Crash and feels like an updated version of the same computer-based sci-fi action. My personal favorite is Cryptonomicon but be forewarned, it's a dense read. He probably is my favorite author right now. I've read and liked pretty much all of his books.

so skipping suggesting some of the major classics...
Not to long ago, I read Ender's Game for the first time. I was really impressed and it's a quick read.

If you want so realistic space exploration work, the Red Mars series by Kim Stanley Robinson is great (the first book is the best in my mind).

When I was younger I loved Larry Niven's Ringworld.

My favorites from that time might have been CJ Chyrrah's Cyteen series. It had this great sociological cloning under theme running throughout.


I stuck to the Science side of Sci-Fi rather than the Fantasy since it sounds like taht's what you're more interested in.
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#60 User is online   oblongatta 

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 07:06 PM

View PostDale Berra, on 26 November 2012 - 06:41 PM, said:

Well, with the discussion of books in this thread at the moment, now is the best time to recommend one of my favorite books. I wouldn't classify it as "science fiction" as much as "post-apocolyptic."

Here's the Amazon.com review:

Walter M. Miller's acclaimed SF classic A Canticle for Leibowitz ...

...


Never read it. That's a good enough recommendation that I'll put it next on my list after I work through this Anna Karenina
You're pretty on the inside,
That's better than not pretty at all,
You're pretty on the inside,
Too bad I'm an outside kinda pretty guy.
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